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Recipe of the Week: Beef Bourguignon

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Recipe of the Week: Beef Bourguignon

Beef Bourguignon started as a peasant’s recipe in the Middle Ages as a way to slow-cook and tenderize tough cuts of meat.

Over time it was refined and perfected into the gourmet dish it’s considered today.  This dish is fairly true to the authentic recipes available today, and not terribly unlike Julia Child’s original recipe.

Generally, this dish is cooked with bacon since lean/tough meats were typically used and adding bacon gave this dish some rich fattiness. I’ve also found that fattier cuts turn out really good as well.

 

Serves five

 6oz bacon, coarsely chopped into strips

3 lbs beef (shanks, chuck, brisket, round roast), trimmed of excess fat, cut into 2″ chunks

1 tbsp white rice flour (optional, see instructions below)

1 small onion, coarsely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 tbsp tomato paste

1/2 bottle (375 ml, about 1.5 cups) medium-bodied red wine (pinot noir preferred)

2 cups beef stock

bouquet garni: 4 sprigs fresh parsley, 6 sprigs fresh thyme, 3 bay leaves (fresh preferred, dried okay)

2 tbsp butter

20 pearl onions, peeled

8 white mushrooms, cut into 1/2″ pieces

3 carrots, peeled and chopped into bite-size chunks

starch to accompany: boiled potatoesmashed potatoesmashed cauliflower, rice

 

Cook the bacon in a large pot or Dutch oven on med/low heat, until crispy. As the bacon cooks, dust your beef pieces with rice flour – this step adds a nice coating to the beef, and helps thicken the sauce, but is ultimately unnecessary if you’re trying to avoid rice altogether. When it’s finished cooking, remove the bacon with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Increase the stovetop heat to medium, then add the beef pieces to the bacon grease and brown for about 3 mins per side, in batches if needed, and set aside the beef when done. Add the chopped onions to the pot, sauté until softened and aromatic, about five minutes. Next, add the tomato paste and garlic, stirring everything together, and sauté until aromatic, about a minute.

Add the beef, bacon, and wine to the pot, and add enough beef stock to cover the beef pieces, about 2 cups. Tie together your bouquet garni with either kitchen twine or some cheesecloth, and add it as well. Bring everything to a simmer, then cover and reduce the heat to low.

You’re going to want to simmer everything until the beef becomes tender, which will take about 2 hours (a little longer if you’re using a very tough or lean cut of meat). There are a few steps to do along the way, and with the right timing everything will come out at the perfect doneness. Quick note as well: be sure to try and skim a little of the fat from the top of the stew from time to time, usually right before adding new veggies.

When there is about an hour of cooking left, it’s time for the next step, which is prepping and adding the veggies. Boil your pearl onions for a minute, fish them out, let them cool, and cut the root side and slip the skin right off (note: many groceries sell peeled, frozen pearl onions, which are very convenient and eliminates this step). In a separate pan, warm the butter on medium heat, then add the onions and sauté them until aromatic (but not totally softened), about four minutes. Add the carrots and sauté for another minute, then add them to the pot. When there are 20 minutes of cooking left, add the chopped mushrooms.

Once the meat is tender and the veggies are done, remove all of the solids from the pot with a slotted spoon and set aside (it’s okay if you don’t scoop out all of the onion pieces and bacon). Discard the bouquet garni. Increase the stovetop heat to med/high, and reduce the sauce by about half – you’ll want about 3 cups of liquid altogether; the sauce will darken was well, which is a good thing. Once the sauce is reduced, remove it from the heat and gently stir in the meat and veggies. Season to taste, adding about 1 tsp each of salt and pepper, and serve immediately.

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chris walkerRuss Crandall is a critically-acclaimed food blogger that focuses on gourmet, traditional, and international dishes that are inherently healthy. You can find him and his delicious recipes at his website, The Domestic Man. He also has a cookbook coming out titled The Ancestral Table, which you can pre-order on Amazon.com.

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  • Ben Hunt

    I can’t wait to try this! Makes me hungry every time I see it.

    • Michael Matthews

      It’s goooood.

  • Cliff

    Late to the party, but is there any macro/calorie info around this dish? Looks delicious, but I’m not sure it’s something I could fit into my diet.

    • Michael Matthews

      Not on this one, so use it as a cheat meal! 🙂

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